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WHAT IS CHILD TRAFFICKING?

CHILD TRAFFICKING DEFINITION

Child trafficking is the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring, or receipt of children under the age of 18 years for the purpose of exploitation. [1]  The exploitation of children includes:

  • All forms of slavery or practices similar to slavery, debt bondage and serfdom, and forced or compulsory labor, including forced or compulsory recruitment of children for use in armed conflict.
  • The use, procuring, or offering of a child for prostitution for the production of pornography or pornographic performances.
  • The use, procuring, or offering of a child for illicit activities—in particular for the production and trafficking of drugs as defined in the relevant international treaties.
  • Work which, by its nature or the circumstances in which it is carried out, is likely to harm the health, safety, or morals of children.
  • Work done by children below the minimum age for admission to employment. [2]

Twenty-six percent of victims forced into labor, including trafficking survivors, are younger than 18 years old, according to the International Labour Organization’s 2012 estimate. [3]    

OUR CHILD RESCUE CENTER

CAUSES OF CHILD TRAFFICKING

The issue of child trafficking is much more complex than simply the kidnapping, abduction, and selling of children. Child trafficking has multiple causes, risk factors, and manifestations. While poverty plays a significant role in why a child may be trafficked, other factors, such as the age and gender of a child, a history of abuse/violence in the family, solo traveling, the demand for child labor, family illness, a natural disaster, and corruption, can all cause a child to be trafficked. [6]

WHO ARE THE CHILD TRAFFICKERS?

Many individuals can be involved in the trafficking of a child. [4]  Child traffickers may include:  Recruiters Intermediaries Document providers Transporters Corrupt officials Service providers Employers Child trafficking operations can function as a corporation, small groups of well-organized criminals, or amateurs who provide a single service. [5]  

EFFECTS OF CHILD TRAFFICKING

The devastating impact trafficking has upon children can have serious and long-lasting effects, including:  Death, serious illness, or permanent injury Subjection to violence, including physical, psychological, and sexual Exposure to substance abuse Psychological damage [7]   

 

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Sources  
[1] United Nations Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime & the Protocols Thereto (2004). United Nations Office on Drugs & Crime. Retrieved on October 7, 2012 from: http://www.unodc.org/documents/treaties/UNTOC/Publications/TOC%20Convention/TOCebook-e.pdf.
[2] Training Manual to Fight Trafficking in Children for Labour, Sexual and Other Forms of Exploitation (2009). International Labour Office, United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund. Retrieved on October 7, 2012 from: http://www.unicef.org/protection/Textbook_1.pdf.
[3] Global estimate of forced labour, Executive Summary (2012). International Labour Office. Retrieved October 7, 2012 from: http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/—ed_norm/—declaration/documents/publication/wcms_181953.pdf.
[4] Child Trafficking: The ILO’s Response through IPEC (2007). International Labour Office, International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour. Retrieved October 7, 2012 from: http://www.ilo.org/ipecinfo/product/viewProduct.do?productId=6484.
[5] Training Manual to Fight Trafficking in Children for Labour, Sexual and Other Forms of Exploitation (2009). International Labour Office, United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund. Retrieved on October 7, 2012 from: http://www.unicef.org/protection/Textbook_1.pdf.
[6] Child Trafficking: The ILO’s Response through IPEC (2007). International Labour Office, International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour. Retrieved October 7, 2012 from: http://www.ilo.org/ipecinfo/product/viewProduct.do?productId=6484.
[7] Training Manual to Fight Trafficking in Children for Labour, Sexual and Other Forms of Exploitation (2009). International Labour Office, United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund. Retrieved on October 7, 2012 from: http://www.unicef.org/protection/Textbook_1.pdf.