Category "Japan"

“I recognized that I was a victim of sextortion.” 

March 21, 2022

A Survivor’s Story

Kanako* is a typical teenager. She likes to hang out with friends and dreams about a steady boyfriend. She has been researching her options to go to a university in a few years. When the stress of upcoming exams and strained relations with her parents became too much, she was relieved to meet a young man online who she believed understood her. “I was nervous at first, but I got to know him through video calls,” said Kanako. “He reassured me that he was someone I could trust.” 

Soon after he began pushing Kanako to send nude photos and videos of herself, and she reluctantly agreed, afraid to lose the only steady relationship in her life. “Once he got the photos I sent, he stopped talking with me and started to cyberbully me before breaking all contact.”

At her lowest point of devastation and fear, Kanako came across ZOE Japan’s content on Twitter. Reading through ZOE’s prevention posts, she realized that she is not alone and that other girls have also gone through the same thing! “I reached out to ZOE via a LINE message and shared my story with the ZOE staff. I recognized that I was a victim of sextortion and that this guy was committing a crime!” With ZOE’s help, Kanako received legal advice at no cost and proceeded with the next steps to bring the perpetrator to justice. We praise God for the opportunity to bring hope and restoration to survivors like Kanako.

*Pseudonym: ZOE protects the identity and dignity of children and does not share actual names or show trafficked children’s faces.

Definition of sextortion: the practice of forcing someone to do something, particularly to perform sexual acts, by threatening to publish naked pictures of them or sexual information about them. (Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/sextortion)

ZOE Japan 2021 Quarter 4 Impact:

  • Japan’s Hotline – Our Japanese and English podcasts extend their reach and recently surpassed 1,000 downloads with listeners in 60 different countries.
  • 14 Presentations/Awareness Opportunities
  • 20 Outreach/prayer walks
  • 30 Interviews with survivors
  • 11 Schools distributed ZOE prevention materials
  • 41,000+ Social Media Profile Visits

Child Trafficking in Japan

September 22, 2021

“As reported over the past five years, human traffickers subject Japanese and foreign men and women to forced labor and sex trafficking, and they subject Japanese children to sex trafficking”

– U.S. Department of State, Trafficking In Persons Report, June 2021

Worth an estimated $24 billion(1), the sex industry of Japan is considered enormous by any standard. The pornography industry alone reached a value of approximately $960 million in 2019(2). To meet this huge demand, it comes as no surprise then that thousands of men, women and children are living in conditions of modern day slavery(3).

What is perhaps surprising, is that the general public remains largely unaware of this terrible evil occurring in plain sight. Those that are familiar with the concept of human trafficking perceive it as something that happens in developing countries as a result of poverty and lack of education, certainly not in Japan.

Skyline of Japan with Lets fight human trafficking in the sky

Skyline of Japan with Lets fight human trafficking in the sky

It is a long and slow process for the authorities and non-profit sector to lift the veil on this terrible crime, introduce much needed policy reforms and facilitate a change in the mindset of survivors, perpetrators and the general public at large. Bi-annual meetings between the government and members of JNATIP (Japan Network Against Trafficking in Persons) provides a critical platform to identify issues and develop action plans to address the gaps.

However, despite the efforts of government and activists, the lack of awareness and remaining legal loopholes provide plenty of opportunities to exploit Japanese and foreign women for prostitution, with perpetrators often targeting women (including single mothers) that are vulnerable after losing their regular jobs due to the impact of COVID-19. Many young men are also trapped in the industry, but Japanese legislation only recognizes women as potential victims, making it extremely difficult for men to find a legal avenue out of their situation.

But it’s not just sex trafficking. In recent years, labor exploitation of migrant workers has come into sharp focus in the local and international media. This is specifically prevalent in the government’s Technical Intern Training Program, which despite its good intentions, often finds sending organizations or local employers abusing loopholes in the system to exploit workers through debt bondage and poor working conditions.

Especially disturbing is the exploitation of children. The possession of child sexual abuse images (child pornography) was declared illegal in 2014, a great step forward, but still remains widely available. This contributes to the exploitation of thousands of children for prostitution, sextortion and various other forms of sexual abuse. While law enforcement is cracking down on perpetrators, NPOs such as ZOE Japan focus on raising awareness among parents and children, a key prevention strategy, and supporting survivors of child trafficking with potentially life-saving information and resources.

The It’s A Penalty Tokyo Campaign provides a fantastic opportunity to accelerate these awareness and prevention efforts. Through this campaign, we aim to provide a message of hope to survivors and to actively engage the public in the battle to eliminate human trafficking in Japan.

As an organization on the front line, we are greatly encouraged to have the backing of It’s A Penalty as we move forward with our goal to reach every person and rescue every child.

Written by Annerie van Wyk

– @ZOEJapan

Hoffman, Michael (25 April 2007). “Japan’s love affairs with sex”. The Japan Times Online. Retrieved 20 December 2017.
https://www.statista.com/statistics/1125880/japan-market-size-non-contact-sex-self-pleasure/
https://www.globalslaveryindex.org/2018/findings/country-studies/japan/

ZOE Japan Brings Awareness to Tokyo Olympics

September 17, 2021

With UK nonprofit, It’s a Penalty, ZOE Japan worked on the frontlines of a large-scale human trafficking awareness campaign for the Tokyo Summer 2021 Olympics, held July 23rd through August 8th.

 

“We are excited to have worked together with It’s a Penalty to raise awareness of human trafficking around the Tokyo Summer Olympics,” said Hiromi Hataji, ZOE Japan Regional Director.

“We prepared various campaign materials and distributed videos, posters, and other awareness materials at airports, train stations, participating hotel groups, and other key locations. The ZOE Japan team also established a new call center that was used during the Olympics and that we will continue to use ongoingly. We have received calls from concerned family members and directly from potential survivors of human trafficking.”

ZOE Japan is spearheading the call center and owns the number, but support for survivors is provided in collaboration with other NPOs that are also members of JNATIP (Japan Network Against Trafficking In Persons).

“By utilizing this professional network, we are able not only to provide support to children but also to connect adult survivors with specialist organizations that can support them,” said Hiromi.

“The call center number is the official number used for the It’s A Penalty campaign, providing a great amount of exposure.  And, now that the Olympics are over, we are continuing to use the same call center number for cases related to children.”

Learn more about the Tokyo Olympics human trafficking awareness campaign.

 

It’s a Penalty campaign video shown on the Tokyo Metro, the Haneda Airport, Shibuya Crossing, on Emirates, Japan Airlines, and Cathay Pacific Flights.

FINDING NEW WAYS TO BE A VOICE FOR THE VOICELESS IN JAPAN

February 10, 2021

Japan,

the land of the rising sun. It’s a name that is associated with state-of-the-art technology, a superb transport infrastructure, attention to detail, quality workmanship, and a humble, polite culture. No wonder that people are surprised to learn that below the shiny surface, things are not always what they seem.

 

A long history of sexual objectification of women and children has led to a society that has become numb to the sexual exploitation of children. Thousands of children are trapped in various forms of trafficking with nowhere to turn!

 

But there is HOPE.

 

ZOE Japan is called to be a voice-for-the-voiceless, and we are fully committed to the kingdom goal of eliminating child trafficking in Japan. God has blessed our small team with a unique set of skills that enables us to reach out to vulnerable children and victims in new ways.

 

For example,

Japan is the home of manga, a unique style of Japanese comic books or graphic novels. It is a powerful communication tool with great potential to be used for prevention work. After all, Jesus himself was a great storyteller and although He did not use manga, His parables continue to convey crucial messages to us until this day. Our trial project to produce our own short manga story was an interesting learning experience, and we are encouraged to see that our format seems to appeal to Japanese young people. New stories are now underway.

 

In addition to various speaking opportunities and outreaches, we have just launched our own podcast channel in English, with a Japanese version coming very soon. Each episode helps the listener to gain a deeper understanding of the challenges that Japan is facing, the various initiatives by the government, ZOE and other NPOs to combat child trafficking, and the additional programs and resources that are required to make a true impact. Our first three episodes can be found on any major podcast app by searching ZOE Japan, or directly on our dedicated web page www.gozoe.jp/podcast.

 

We are also excited about:

New doors that are opening to reach Japan through the performing arts, and have taken the first step by producing a beautiful music video in collaboration with a local Christian artist. The video is sure to touch the heart of any vulnerable teenager, and provides a bridge for us to share the gospel of Jesus, and to educate them about the dangers of trafficking. See the video on the ZOE Japan YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xbRRC8dl1E

 

God is moving in Japan, for sure.

 

If you feel the Holy Spirit tugging at your heart strings, then don’t hesitate! Partner with us today, because together we can reach every person and rescue every child.

Love-less Love Hotels

January 28, 2021

Japan is notorious for its sex industry, more often referred to as the adult entertainment industry. All major train stations are surrounded by izakaya (a Japanese traditional bar), hostess bars, karaoke venues, and Love Hotels. Sadly, these “Love Hotels” promise everything but love.

 

Love hotels offer customers elaborately decorated rooms that can be booked for anything from one hour to multiple days. All kinds of sexual toys, cosplay clothing, food, and accessories can be ordered for room delivery without ever encountering any hotel staff face-to-face. Even the check-in process is completely contactless in order to protect the privacy of customers. An article on May 12th in Japan Today reports that the demand for this so-called “love” did not decline with the COVID-19 pandemic, but instead has increased in suburban areas.

 

Regrettably, these hotels are not frequented by married couples looking for a romantic getaway, but instead are often used to exploit women and children or engage in extramarital affairs. It is even considered a common and acceptable business practice for business colleagues to go to an izakaya for drinking after work, followed by karaoke in a hostess bar, finally leading for a Love Hotel for a few hours before catching the last train home. If only we could stand on the rooftops of these hotels and shout out: THIS IS NOT LOVE!  

 

The Bible teaches us about real love:  

Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. 1 Corinthians 13

 

In a recent case:

in the Machida/Yokohama area, a 10-year old girl was groomed through TikTok by a 34-year old perpetrator. Excited to meet her new online friend face-to-face, the young girl was probably surprised to find that he was an adult male that had more than friendship in mind. Already familiar with her school name and home address, it was easy for him to threaten and manipulate the frightened child to accompany him to a Love Hotel where he sexually assaulted her. If only we could’ve accelerated our prevention efforts and ensured that the hotel staff were trained to identify and report this trafficking case before the abuse could take place.  We could’ve saved this child from the guilt, shame, and fear that she had to suffer! This is just one of many cases that happen daily in Japan.

 

There are several ways that you can partner with us to stop the exploitation at Love Hotels. Firstly, make sure that the children you have contact with are aware of the dangers of grooming through social media. Secondly, pray for ZOE Japan as we work with various stakeholders to call for stricter regulation over the Love Hotel industry, including mandatory training for hotel staff and the availability of awareness and prevention materials in hotels to provide information to potential victims. Thirdly, consider a one-time or ongoing donation to ZOE Japan so that we can expand and accelerate our prevention efforts.

 

May those who purchase services at Love Hotels and the staff discover the TRUE LOVE of Jesus and invite Him into their lives to fill the void in their hearts and set them free!

 

Author:

Annerie Van Wyk, ZOE Japan Missionary

REVENGE PORNOGRAPHY

November 12, 2020

Every year, as the school year draws to an end, many students are breathing a sigh of relief, eager to escape the daily routine of going to school. Because on top of the academic pressure, cram schools, and after-school activities, some students are now facing a new enemy…“revenge porn.”  

“Revenge pornography” is when explicit photos or images of a person are distributed (mostly online) without his/her consent with the intention to embarrass or cause emotional harm.  

According to the National Police Agency in Japan

According to the National Police Agency in Japan, the number of cases continue to rise with as many as 1,559 “revenge porn” cases affecting children reported in 2019. More than 80% of those cases were related to junior high and high school students, but sadly even preschool children fell victim in more than 50 cases.  

Sometimes children become victims by participating in sexting, the sending and receiving of explicit content such as nude selfies, which are then later used by previous romantic partners or friends to embarrass or bully them. In a recent case reported by local media, a group of junior high school boys secretly filmed girls in the locker room and sold the photos and videos via online chat.

Fear and Anxiety

Victims find themselves in a constant state of fear and anxiety, often leading to severe depression, or worse. Their vulnerability now exposed, they become easy targets for child sex traffickers who will use deception or manipulation to exploit them further.   

ZOE Japan

ZOE Japan is blessed to have a strong relationship with another NPO in Japan that supports victims of “revenge pornography” and removes the harmful images from the web. Through this relationship, we are able to observe, learn, and participate in the counseling process to ensure that survivors receive the necessary legal support to clear their names and start the restoration journey. It’s a wonderful opportunity for us to expand our professional network and gain experience in supporting survivors.  

Pray

Please pray for spiritual protection, strength, and wisdom for our team members, and for opportunities to share the love of Jesus with survivors and staff.  

-Japan Team

ZOE Japan to Meet with Government Officials

October 14, 2020

On October 29th and November 30th, ZOE Japan will have the unique opportunity as JNATIP members to meet directly with various government officials to discuss policy reforms and various anti-trafficking initiatives.

There are several topics on the agenda to be discussed with different government departments; and all of them are very important for the purpose of protecting children and people in vulnerable positions.

One of the main agenda items is related to simulated and virtual child sexual abuse material (child pornography). In Japan, possession of child sexual abuse material  became illegal in 2014, but it excludes simulated or virtual child sexual abuse material  such as anime, manga, child sex dolls, and virtual reality. Those in favor of continued freedom to produce these kinds of materials argue for freedom of expression in the arts, and that no real children are being harmed in the production of these materials. There are also arguments that it could prevent pedophiles from committing crimes against children in real life.

However, according to the book Pedophilia Disorder – It Is Not Love written by Akiyoshi Saito, a psychiatric social worker and the Director of a rehabilitation clinic for people with various forms of addiction, the majority of patients who have been charged with a crime and being treated for pedophilia at his clinic had the regular habit of watching or looking at child sexual abuse material multiple times a day. This indicates that the contents were not keeping them from committing a crime, but the material might be increasing their desire to abuse a real child instead of providing an outlet.

The real concern is not whether the child is real or not, but instead the intention of the material to sexualize children, potentially leading to more abusers and victims in our communities. We need to make every effort to eliminate content that could place children at risk.

We are hopeful for an open discussion with the government representatives that will lead to   tangible action points to modify the law to protect children from being sexualized or objectified in any form.

The second topic that we will address is the age of sexual consent.†During the Meiji era (1880s), the age of consent was set at 13 years old, and remains valid until this day. This has been a hindering issue when identifying human trafficking cases and punishing child traffickers. When a 13-year-old child has the legal authority to consent to sexual activities, it creates a huge challenge to provide evidence of exploitation, with abusers simply claiming that that child consented and receiving very light penalties if convicted.

For example, if an abuser connects with a minor through a social media platform and they develop a “romantic relationship,” often, it turns into a sexually abusive relationship which can also be filmed, photographed, and uploaded online. In addition, there are cases in which accommodation and food are provided to runaway children, and sexual activity is required in return. Such cases clearly fit the definition of human trafficking, but if the victim fails to legally prove that it was clearly nonconsensual by use of means of threat or violence, this often leads to very light sentences for perpetrators (if convicted) and a high rate of repeat offenses.

This age of consent not only fails to deter crime and exploitation but also provides legal advantages to traffickers and abusers.

In the upcoming meetings, we will have the opportunity to discuss the possibility of raising the age of consent to 16 to protect young people from sexual crimes at a fundamental level and to punish child sex offenders.

As we are taking these bold steps to be a voice for the voiceless children of Japan, please pray that we will experience God’s favor at the meetings, and that the decisions made will reflect His perfect will for Japan!

Written by Yuri Osborne (Japan Regional Manager)

Hi-rise building

Fighting On Our Knees

June 23, 2020

The recent suicide of TV star and pro-wrestler, Hana Kimura, sent a shock wave through Japan. Kimura, only 22 years old, was the target of cyberbullies. Before her death, she published several messages on social media, but it was already too late before anyone took notice. The story has lifted the veil on a huge cyberbullying problem, encouraging society and the government to take action.  

In Japan, it is extremely important to blend in or, more specifically, to not stand out. There is even an expression that says “the nail that stands out, must be hammered.” Those who do not conform to group expectations, or even look different, often become the targets of bullying by their peers.  

In fact, Japan is seeing a rapid increase in the number of bullying cases in schools, with more than 540,000 cases reported in 2018, a 30% increase from 2017. Many children are simply not able to handle this pressure on top of academic expectations already imposed by their families, and sometimes revert to extreme measures such as taking their own lives. Statistics show that suicide is the leading cause of death for children aged 10-19.  

It is hard not to be overwhelmed by these statistics. Not only do our hearts break for their families, but we get upset by the deception of the enemy, somehow convincing these children that they have no value and no purpose, that there is no hope. This lie from the enemy sharply contradicts the truth we find in Scripture.  

Psalm 139:13-14:  

For You created my inmost being; You knit me together in my mother’s womb.I praise You because I am fearfully and wonderfully made; Your works are wonderful, I know that full well.

How amazing to see every child through God’s eyes! At ZOE Japan, we are convinced that God wants us to invert the lies of the enemy, show every child that he/she has VALUE, is LOVED and has a PURPOSE. By helping them to recognize their identity in Christ, we can bring healing to bullies and victims!  

An analysis of child suicides for the period 2006-2015 by the Japan Support Centre for Suicide Countermeasures shows a significant peak in suicides of 6-18 year olds at the end of August/beginning September, right before the new school year starts.  

The time for us to take action is NOW.  We call on every Christian to stand with us in prayer as we fight on our knees for the life of every child in Japan.  

Please pray that: 

  • Children will not be deceived by the lies of the enemy 
  • The Body of Christ will actively engage in sharing HOPE through the Good News
  • Government Childlines will have resources and wisdom to provide counselling and support for children who are being bullied or abused
  • Parents and teachers will have a sensitive spirit to identify vulnerable children and the wisdom on how to support them.

Written By: Annerie Van Wyk, ZOE Japan Missionary

Family Relationships Key In Preventing Trafficking

May 15, 2020

In every country in the world, including Japan, the COVID-19 lockdown is challenging traditional perspectives and, to a certain extent, even redefining the values of society.

Japan is famous for its hard-working culture; with fathers, mostly employed as so-called salarymen, working excessive overtime – often just to live up to society’s expectations. 

There is even a term, karoshi, which means to literally work yourself to death. Although hard work is admirable, it presents the danger of a generation of children growing up with a father who is basically invisible. He is often just the tired man in the dark suit who comes home late and leaves again early.

The absence of fathers creates an open door for the enemy to attack children. Many young boys don’t have a role model to teach them the meaning of being a real man who values women. Instead, they absorb and mimic whatever the media feeds them. Many young girls learn about life and love from friends, movies or online.

To fill the emotional void, children often turn to a popular networking app where they can interact with randomly selected strangers, ignorant of the danger of traffickers just waiting to take advantage of their vulnerability. What starts as a seemingly innocent online friendship soon leads to a face-to-face meeting with the trafficker during which the child is sexually abused. Photos and video footage taken during the abuse become key weapons that the trafficker uses to instill fear and force the child into further submission and continued abuse. Without the safety net of strong family relationships, children simply don’t have the courage to turn to their parents for help.

Government reports show that “the number of people under 18 who fell victim to social media-linked sexual and other crimes in Japan in 2019, rose 271 from the previous year to a record 2,082 cases.” These are only the reported cases; the tip of the iceberg. But there is always HOPE.

And your life will be brighter than the noonday;
its darkness will be like the morning.
And you will feel secure, because there is hope:
you will look around and take your rest in security.
Job 11:17-18

Just observing the parks in our neighborhood during the lockdown, COVID-19 is clearly bringing families together – perhaps for the first time. The previously invisible fathers are suddenly popping up everywhere! They are pitching to their future baseball-hero sons, or jumping rope with their daughters. We see them climbing trees, creating memories together, sometimes even crying and just being vulnerable together. We truly believe that these restored relationships are not only a blessing to all family members, but also serve as a natural prevention strategy against child trafficking.

“Many times it takes just one member of a family to initiate the action to bring a family back together again.” – Billy Graham

As their hearts are softened by the joys of being part of an earthly family, may they also discover the love of our Heavenly Father and open their hearts to Him.

Written By: Annerie Van Wyk, ZOE Japan Missionary

Evangelism Through English Ministry in Japan

May 7, 2020

Schools are still closed down in Japan. At the J.O.Y. Club staff meeting, it was decided that J.O.Y. Club would be closed until public schools are reopened.

Joy Tani, the ZOE missionary who oversees the J.O.Y. Club English teaching ministry reports that one fifth grade boy, “Taku,” who has been in J.O.Y. Club for only one year had some amazing questions about Jesus. As he was leaving J.O.Y. Club this year, we really felt he was ready to receive Christ and gave him the opportunity at his last class. What a joy to see him raise his hand and pray together with the Bible  time teacher to ask Jesus into his heart. 

We had 6 students leaving J.O.Y. Club this year and with every child, Joy was able to tell each one individually before leaving, “Remember, your teacher Joy loves, but Jesus loves you more!” 

J.O.Y. Club was started over 20 plus years ago. Each year we have seen children and even parents accept Christ in J.O.Y. Club classes and at our family outreaches. But in the past 2 years, we have never seen so many children so willing and eager to accept Christ in such a short amount of time.

At our last J.O.Y. Club family outreach, we had a J.O.Y. Club father accept Christ. He is now doing English classes with Joy and Bible time with Hiromi, a ZOE national missionary. It’s wonderful to see how open he is during the Bible time. 

As April is the start of the school year here in Japan, we have not been able to advertise about J.O.Y. Club as much as we normally do because of the Corona Virus.

Please join us in prayer that we would have more children and families to minister to this year once the pandemic is over.                                                                                

We so desire more opportunities to share about Jesus in this beautiful nation of Japan.

*header image taken before Covid lockdown

Instant Gratification & the Dangers of It

March 13, 2020

“A nice hot cup of tea would be nice,” I thought the other day while at work. Rather than going through all the trouble, I put a coin in the vending machine and out came my instant gratification.

It is beyond description how highly “convenience” is valued in our culture. You can get almost anything from vending machines, stores, and the Internet.

And this is what sex has become.

In Japan, you can scroll through your phone and select a girl to be delivered to your place in less than an hour. Pornographic sites are just a click away, easy even for a child to access.

Sex became such an accessible, disposable product in our culture. Like fast food, it’s ready for you as soon as you crave it. Such disposable consumption makes us grow numb to true satisfaction.

In the process of numbing our senses to the sacredness of sex, human trafficking begins to creep into our society. There are sex traffickers who dare to think that they are “helping” their victims by providing a job. There are even pedophiles who believe that they are “educating” children when they are horrifically abusing them.

A person does not become a sex trafficker overnight. It is through the process of devaluing sex and numbing their senses to true satisfaction that lead to exploitation of others for their selfish gains.

As long as society makes sex a convenient disposable product, vulnerable people and children will be objectified for exploitation and human trafficking will continue.

We must emphasize the importance of teaching the youth about the true value of sex. Because once it violates boundaries, it doesn’t stop. Sex is never a vending machine product that we purchase and dispose of on our way through life.

It is God’s beautiful design, meant to be cherished, protected, and sacredly valued as we see in the Bible.

This is an extremely important and urgent subject to teach especially young generations because they have the potential to become both victim and perpetrator.

At ZOE Japan, we have the opportunity to share a love and ultimate true satisfaction through Jesus Christ with a nation that is 1% Christian, shedding light that instant gratification will never fully satisfy our soul.

Japan

October 10, 2019

Japan, like many countries worldwide, has a human trafficking problem. “Japan is a destination, source, and transit country for men and women subjected to forced labor and sex trafficking, and for children subjected to sex trafficking” (Trafficking In Person Report 2017).

One part of the problem is Enjo Kosai – also known as “compensated dating” which often leads towards the sex trafficking of Japanese children. Enjo Kosai is child sexual exploitation in exchange for money and/or luxury gifts by older men.

There are also sophisticated and organized prostitution networks that target vulnerable Japanese women and girls in public areas such as subways, popular youth hangouts, schools, and online. Japanese citizens, particularly runaway teenage girls, children of foreign and Japanese citizens who have acquired citizenship, and their foreign mothers, are also subjected to sex trafficking.

In the last decade the government has recognized the problem of human trafficking. In Japan, ZOE is a member of JNATIP (Japan Network Against Trafficking in Persons). This network includes NGOs, lawyers, and academics who are looking to formulate effective laws concerning the prevention of trafficking in persons, victim relief, and the punishment of perpetrators.

ZOE is also currently working in the area of prevention. ZOE’s goal in Japan is to prevent trafficking by providing education in churches, schools, and communities. ZOE plans to build a shelter in Japan for children who are at risk of or survivors of trafficking. Stay connected with the work in Japan here.